The signs of an upcoming global pilot shortage are mounting as airlines continue to expand their fleets and tighten flight schedules to meet the surging demand in the emerging markets. Many young people seeing the promising numbers instantly decide to become pilots. However, as amazing as the pilot profession is, it requires an exceptionally high level of responsibility throughout the entire career.

Yes – aviation studies require investment, the profound knowledge of mathematics, physics and English as well as distinct social competences. But it all starts with doing a proper homework involving a thorough self-analysis. Have you ever tried to answer questions as to what your strong sides truly are, what needs to be improved, where you could work, what is needed to achieve your goal? Still the most important stage in this process is to answer the question – are you really ready to become a professional commercial pilot?

BAA Training has prepared a list of 5 pilot profession-related aspects to consider before deciding whether this lifestyle suits a person:

  • Studying for life. The job of a pilot comes with heavy responsibility and personal commitment. Stringent training courses have to be passed followed by recurrent training every six months in order to maintain the relevant license required for the job.
  • Range of hidden processes. There is more to the role than just flying the plane, which has to be done safely and economically, and tasks can typically include ensuring that all the information on the route, weather, passengers and aircraft is accurate; briefing the cabin crew before the flight; communicating with passengers; reacting quickly and appropriately to environmental changes; making regular checks on the aircraft.
  • Constant travelling. Which place in the world can you call home? Christmas at home with your family or in a hotel with the crew? Seeing your relatives and friends each day or meeting new people while travelling around the globe? Birthday with your friends in a disco or on a plane flying over Africa with the crew?
  • Standard of sharpness. As dynamic as a pilot profession is, a pilot must always radiate perfect physical appearance with a nice suit, pressed shirt, tidy haircut, clean and shaven face, thus fitting and maintaining professional standards.
  • Fatigue. While aircraft are usually clean and comfortable, the job involves considerable risks. For example, commercial pilots on international routes suffer from jet lag—a disorientation and fatigue caused by many hours of flying through different time zones.

One of the instructors has once said: ‘If every time you turn your head up when you see a plane – you are half way to being a successful pilot’. Motivation is a prior catalyst for making the first steps in aviation. Thorough self-analysis will certainly help to find out whether you are ready to accept the challenges that come with the job.

BAA Training pays the utmost attention to the suitability and aptitude of aviation personnel as well as aviation safety issues. During the World Aviation Training Conference (WATS 2011) the BAA team introduced its unique pilot screening process entitled ‘General Human Recourse Principals in Aviation Business: Commercial Pilot Student Candidate Assessment’. The Academy is constantly doing internal research and aims at adapting training courses for distinct geographical regions. Not a long time ago the company launched special internet based seminars – webinars – for pilots’ beginners.

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